A Quick Guide To My Dwarf Hamsters

If you don’t follow me on Instagram (@chloemetz_) you might not be aware that I am a proud hamster mumma. I’ve spoken about my Hamsters in blogs too but someone pointed out I’ve never written whole posts about them.

Currently I have 5 Hammies, yep 5 (I blame Ali completely). In the top left we have Ghost (white) and Nymeria (gray) they are our youngest and, yes, they are named after the direwolves from Game of Thrones. On the top right we have Wompa, she was on her own in the shop and that’s how she stayed (more on that later). At the bottom are my oldest Artoo & BB. We were going with a Star Wars theme.

These aren’t the only ones we’ve had either, before this we had Noodle (left) and Hamski (right), they were mine and Ali’s first hamsters together and they were adorable. After that we had Wickett on the left. I also had a Syrian Hamster as a kid called Lampie (after Frank Lampard) but I don’t have any pictures of him on my laptop.

First things first, there are different types, I’m going to talk about the types I’ve had. You have Syrian Hamsters they are much bigger and MUST LIVE ALONE. These are probably the slowest hamsters and if handled right are very social at night because they’re much more nocturnal.

Now, for Dwarfs we have Russian Dwarfs and Robovski of which I have both. Wickett, BB and Artoo are all Robovski hamsters these are absolutely tiny and incredibly fast. No word of a lie when we bought Wickett home he ran up my arm (out of the cage) jumped out and ran up the wall. I’ve also found that these little guys normally take longer to tame because they are so anxious and timid. BB and Artoo are still not crazy about being held for long periods of time.

On the other hand Hamski, Noodle, Wompa, Ghost and Nymeria are all Russian Dwarf Hamsters. This means they’re a fair bit bigger and for the most part are much more comfortable being held – although this still takes time and can include a few bites while they get used to you (I’m looking at you Wompa).

Russian & Robovski Dwarfs are meant to live in groups and are usually adopted in pairs. That said I have one of each who have lived alone and were happy enough – this is because there was an odd number in the litter. Each hamster is an individual – a lot of people scoff at this but all animals do. Hammie’s might only live for 2ish years but my goodness each of these have a piece of my heart.

Lampie was very sweet and gentle, Hamski loved cuddles and being carried around in pockets and on shoulders, Noodle was very much a baby quieter than Hamski but also loved attention and fuss. Wickett was my little buddy when Ali first went on tour, although it look a while he ended up loving falling asleep in my hand until it went numb and being mumma’s little muchkin.

BB and Artoo are very much like their namesakes, with one being very hyperactive and noisy and the other just going along with it and just doing their own thing. Wompa is named after the snow monster in Star Wars (her Dad’s idea), I wanted to call her Leia but then she turned out to be pretty bitey so the name stuck, after she calmed down she loved being cuddled. That said, she definitely lets you know when she wants to go back to bed – that’s my girl!

And finally Nymeria and Ghost are a funny pair. While Ghost doesn’t mind being held, it’s definitely on his terms and he’d much rather be napping. Nymeria on the other hand wants attention all the time, if he hears me in the room he will squeak until I go and check on him and he’ll climb into my hand for a cuddle before settling on my shoulder or chest.

Also – I wanted to give a shout out to my sisters lovely hamster Fudge who was an adorable ginger Syrian and a little character all himself with a very sweet nature.

So, that’s my little love bugs. Every time one passes I say no more…but I also said a year ago. Again, I blame Ali. Would you like to know more about how to care for a Hammie? What you need? Let me know in the comments below.

Thanks for reading guys! 🐹🐹🐹🐹🐹

Sunday Seven: 22 and a half

This week I hit 22 and a half, I know most adults don’t count their half birthdays, but firstly I don’t see myself as an adult and secondly I like using this as a benchmark to take stock of what I’ve done in half a year. I mentioned way back in January that I don’t like making New Years Resolutions, instead, I like to use my year birthday to birthday to see how things I have been going. So let’s take a look back and see what I’ve learnt in the past 6 months.

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You don’t need loads of friends to be happy 

Now I’m back in Basingstoke we don’t have as many friends around, but that really doesn’t matter. I still talk to Joe all the time, although it sucks I can’t just pop and see him. I also have Abbie and Ben on the other side of town. I have a lot smaller group of people that I’m in contact with but it’s really about the quality rather than the quantity.

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The pain of losing someone you love never goes away, you learn how to deal with it

A few weeks after my birthday I lost one of my hamsters. Although, to me they are my babies. Noodle passed away and it broke my heart, I still miss her each and every day and that never stops.

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I want to write, so I’ll goddam write 

Enough messing around, it was time to get serious, get planning and get on with it. We’ll see what happens…

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Having your own space is key to happiness 

We finally moved home! Having our own space has made it much easier for me to relax and have time to myself and Ali.

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It’s ok not to be ok. 

I have a problem with wanting to be perfect. I always have. In the last few months when things have gotten tricky I’ve had to remind myself that I’m allowed to feel tired or overwhelmed, that I’m human. So, I did what I always do and I wrote about it and it made me feel a lot better.

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Leaving a job that isn’t right for you doesn’t make you a failure

Back in November I left my first full-time job for a variety of reasons. I wasn’t happy there and didn’t feel like it was right. When I left, even though I had another job lined up, I felt like a failure because I hadn’t been there long. That said it lead on to bigger and better things and just because it didn’t work out didn’t mean I was a failure.

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Grades aren’t everything. 

For a good few months, I hid my degree certificate. I didn’t want people to know that I wasn’t perfect and didn’t get the first I’d been dreaming about. I hated mentioning it and whenever I did I’d follow up with ‘but I was only 3% off of a first!’ as if getting a 2:1 in literature was something to be ashamed of. I won’t lie and say it doesn’t hurt but at the same time my life was a mess in third year, to come out at all with a degree is fine with me. It now happily sits on my desk while I write.