Using A Walking Stick In Your Twenties

What It’s Like Using A Walking Stick In Your 20s

This year I want to talk more about living with a chronic health condition. I’ve decided I’m done with it being a secret – this is me! Something that I found difficult at first was using a walking stick in public – and I don’t think I’m the only one!

As with many invisible illnesses people can misinterpreted why you need that seat on the bus/tube/train. Even with a ‘please offer me a seat badge’ I always felt that people were questioning me with their stares. I look young and healthy, ‘too young to have those problems’ as people have told me.

When using a walking stick, in theory, this should make people a little more understanding, although in my experience people are still questioning as to why someone young is using a walking stick.

Walking Stick in Disneyland

Way back when I initially broke my back, walking was a struggle and while I was recovering I still found a numbness in my legs that came and went. When I had to go out for the day I used a crutch to try and balance myself, hoping that with time and exercises the feeling would come back properly.

After a period of time I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and a big part of living with it is finding ways to make you illness more bearable and control the illness rather than the other way around. One of my friends used a foldable walking stick, so I hesitantly ordered one.

I’ll admit when I first got it I hid it away. I was embarrassed – there weren’t many nice designs and it felt so old. That was until I knew I was headed into London – I’d need the support, so I took it with me folded in my bag ‘just in case’. And, you guessed it I ended up using it.

Wheelchair in Disneyland

I’d love to say after that I didn’t feel self-conscious, I still do sometimes! Going to Disneyland in September was the most I’d used it in one go, as well as a wheelchair. I was suddenly self-conscious, I didn’t want people to think I couldn’t do stuff for myself or feel sorry for me – and I think that was my biggest fear. That this would take my independence.

It did nothing of the sort, in fact it made me feel prepared. Because I have one that folds down it means that I can see how I feel and if I do need to use it, I can. The biggest block for me was mental. It worried what people thought and now I’m happy enough to tell them why I use it and if they don’t like it that’s their problem.

Using a walking stick in my twenties wasn’t exactly how I thought things would go but I really have 2 choices. I struggle to walk and am in a lot of pain on days I would like to enjoy myself, or I use the damn stick. Which would you choose?

5 ways to pace yourself over Christmas

5 Ways To Pace Yourself Over Christmas

CHRISTMAS IS COMING!

I absolutely love Christmas, it’s one of my favourite times of the year BUT it’s also incredibly busy. Because of that, I need to pace myself and I know that’s the case for a lot of other Spoonies too! So here are 5 ways I plan to pace myself.

If you can get things done in advance, go for it! 

I started Christmas shopping as early as I possibly could. Not for the bragging rights (although yes it is a nice feeling) because it took a lot of pressure and stress out of the run-up to Christmas.

It also meant I could spread the cost out which was another thing off of my mind. For me, long periods of intense stress can cause a flare so I’ll try and help myself as much as possible.

Plan in rest time. 

I know that I need to get a good sleep and not be on the go every minute of every day. I need to plan in rest breaks to make sure that I’m healthy and can get the best out of the day.

To do this, I try and have at least one day of the weekend to myself or make it more chilled. I try and make sure that I get to bed at a reasonable time too! Health is important and being sick over Christmas completely sucks.

Know that it’s ok to say no! 

Everyone wants to meet up, go to this, go to that. As much as I’d love to go and do everything the simple fact is that I can’t. Over Christmas, I miss out on pay because I’m Freelance! I need to not only look after my health but also my bank balance!

Let people help you.  

I’m not great at this. I fight to be as independent as possible but with such a busy time of year taking help when possible can really help. Someone else wants to drive? Let them! Someone else wants to do the cooking. Go ahead! If people want to help you they’re doing it out of kindness and, usually, love.

Try and stay in some kind of routine where you can! 

Christmas day is obviously exempt from this if you are like me and wake up stupidly early because you are so excited. I get a week and a bit where I’m not working. As much as I want to nap as much as possible every single afternoon I know it’s going to impact me later so I try and stick to some kind of routine.

I might get up a little later, stay up more or go out with friends – but I still have some idea of getting a good 8-9 hours every night then get dressed and get on with what I want or need to do.

 

Is there anything you’d add to this list? Let me know in the comments below!

Paying for a good time – Spoonie Life

Like most 20 somethings I want to have adventures, memories I can look back on when life slows down a bit and say ‘that was a damn good time’. Unlike most of the people I know, they don’t have to barter with their health. If you’re a fellow Spoonie, you’re probably nodding in agreement.

Back in September, I was lucky enough to go to Disneyland with my Mum and sister. I mean, DISNEYLAND! We were taking a trip to Paris and I was ready for it, matching t-shirts and ears were essentials. From the moment we booked I also had a niggling feeling, a voice in the back fo my mind you’re going to pay for it later. And, boy did I. Even though we rented a wheelchair, got fast passes so, and had rest stops in the hotel (on more than one occasion I had to take emergency naps so that I could watch the fireworks or make it through dinner. I thought I’d handled the trip reasonably well it wasn’t until the last day I realised… I was in minus numbers, the spoons were scattered all over the floor.

 

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The thought that we have to ‘pay’ or reserve our spoons when we know we’re going to have to do something that will make us tired is hard. When I was first diagnosed, I rebelled against it – a lot. I got incredibly depressed and tried to prove to myself I could still do everything – I wasn’t ready to accept I needed to modify things. Now, I am better, I’ll try and plan a rest day here and there or not set my alarm and just let myself sleep. Little things that make life easier.

I joke that a big night out or day of big plans has me making deals with the devil, but really it’s made me appreciate them even more. As soon as I acknowledged that this was my life now, I started appreciating the things I do, because I have to choose them carefully. That doesn’t mean I can’t be spontaneous and have a trip on the beach – but I just have to rest a little more, maybe get a train rather than drive.

I refused to give up every fun part of my life to this illness – and I know I am truly lucky to do so.